The Importance of Mood Boards in E-Design

If you who haven’t heard, E-Design (also known as E-Decorating) is a new way of providing design-savvy DIY clients with professionally designed interiors at an affordable price.  Because the clients do some of the work themselves and the designer never actually meets the client or sees their space in person, interior designers are able to offer e-design services at just a fraction of the cost of traditional full-service design.  The designer saves time by focusing only on the design portion of the project, and the client saves money.

Mood Board Completed for Tastemaker, Inc. by Heather Zerah
Mood Board Completed for Tastemaker, Inc. by Heather Zerah

As a relatively new concept, the e-design process is still evolving.  Through trial and error, designers and clients are discovering what works, what doesn’t, and how best to handle long-distance communication effectively.  Through my own business, E-Interiors by Heather Zerah, as well as through my work with the e-decorating website Tastemaker, I have found one element to be essential in the communication process: Mood Boards.

Mood Board Completed for Tastemaker, Inc. by Heather Zerah
Mood Board Completed for Tastemaker, Inc. by Heather Zerah

A Mood Board is a collage of images that represent the interior designer’s vision for a particular space.  Mood boards often combine photos of rooms from design magazines and blogs, abstract images, and photos of furniture or decor that may eventually be used in the design.  The designer’s vision is based upon the client’s initial description of their style, needs, and goals for their room.  Usually presented in the early stages of the design process, the mood board is essential to ensure that the designer and client understand the direction a design is headed.  Words can mean different things to different people.  For example, a client and designer might have completely different perceptions of what the word “traditional” means, or what the color “green” actually looks like.  By gathering images together in a mood board, a designer can paint a clear picture to convey style, mood, color scheme, and more.  The client and designer can then discuss specific details of the mood board, whether good or bad, to make sure that all parties are in agreement.  The end result is a hassle-free process where the designer knows what the client wants, and the client doesn’t receive any unwelcome surprises in the final design box.

Mood Board Completed for Tastemaker, Inc. by Heather Zerah
Mood Board Completed for Tastemaker, Inc. by Heather Zerah

Due to the creative nature of interior design, you will find that mood board styles vary widely from one designer to the next.  Personally, I like to incorporate a lot of text among my images.  Just as the word “traditional” can mean different things to different people, images can be perceived differently.  While I might include an image because I love the shade of blue paint on the walls, a client might only see an unattractive coffee table, thus missing the point of the image.  By incorporating text I can call out specific details to help the client understand which elements of an image pertain to their room.  Because every new room design is unique and personalized, it can be challenging to find images that truly capture a designer’s goal for a particular project.  However, by incorporating verbal and visual information into a mood board and then listening closely to the client’s feedback, a designer can produce a one-of-a-kind look that fits the client perfectly.

To find out more about E-Interiors by Heather Zerah, visit my website:

http://heatherzerah.com/HZI/E-Interiors_by_Heather_Zerah,_offering_convenient_and_affordable_e-design_to_clients_nationwide.html

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